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 Post subject: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 9:51 pm 
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So I've attempted shape mods a few times but I can never seem to make straight cuts. And when they are straight, they end up going in the complete wrong direction. I see a lot of people taking puzzles, taping them up, and then just chopping away and their cuts come out smooth and flat and exactly where they want them. I understand this comes from experience but are there any pointers for just starting out?

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 10:59 pm 
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Hold your saw casual and don't push to hard. You need more time but the result is better.


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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:06 pm 
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Also, always cut with room to spare then sand down to the precise line, using flat sandpaper to keep things planar. Be careful how you hold the puzzle when you sand, if you allow your hand to rotate a bit it will round the surface. And try to keep the desired cut plan parallel to the sandpaper or you'll get a nice planar but wrong cut.

Dave

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:56 pm 
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My experience in making puzzle mods by hands is slightly different in that even though I am generally handy (around the house, that is), I may not be that handy when working with small objects like puzzle parts. So for me the first rule is repeatability - how to make things repeatable so that the next part is identical to the previous. Sometimes it's just a matter of a carefully prepared jig. But sometimes is comes down to my rule number two: go as slow as possible to keep the required precision. Yes, it may take me an hour where someone else would do it in 5 minutes, but ultimately it works out for the better. Don't try to mimic Tony Fisher's puzzle making videos, at least not until you're comfortable with tools yourself and have made numerous puzzles by hand. 8-)

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:26 am 
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I can't cut straight to save my life so I make allowances. Instead of cutting straight through I cut a little, turn the piece and cut from the other side as shown here- http://youtu.be/XH6U8Z0wyqg?t=1m28s . I think the main thing is to make sure the part you are cutting is securely held. It doesn't have to be in a vice but if it isn't it should be jammed against something and held firmly. As others have said always cut with something to spare and tidy up later.

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 1:46 pm 
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I've never perfected it! I just use a dremel for the whole thing!

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 4:19 pm 
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I think that it is just something you've got or not, but I find doing straight cuts is not too hard. I suppose it may come from many hours of doing woodwork at a young age (far too many years ago) but I just have a eye for it :)

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 12:11 pm 
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Gus wrote:
I think that it is just something you've got or not, but I find doing straight cuts is not too hard. I suppose it may come from many hours of doing woodwork at a young age (far too many years ago) but I just have a eye for it :)


I got into woodworking after making puzzles - and indeed, the skills are very similar.

In fact - I learned how to carve cottonwood bark - it is very soft, and a great way to practice such things...

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 9:11 am 
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Thanks for all the advice guys! I have a puzzle all chopped up and now I just need to fill, sand, paint, and sticker.

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 10:29 am 
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BN wrote:
Thanks for all the advice guys! I have a puzzle all chopped up and now I just need to fill, sand, paint, and sticker.

Don't fill, cap!

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 10:54 am 
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Tony Fisher wrote:
BN wrote:
Thanks for all the advice guys! I have a puzzle all chopped up and now I just need to fill, sand, paint, and sticker.

Don't fill, cap!


Tony, I don't understand, is there a downside to filling when compared with capping? I've never capped because I don't have any plastic sheeting, I assume the only downside is weight and possibly cost?

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 11:23 am 
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JackRTully wrote:
Tony Fisher wrote:
BN wrote:
Thanks for all the advice guys! I have a puzzle all chopped up and now I just need to fill, sand, paint, and sticker.

Don't fill, cap!


Tony, I don't understand, is there a downside to filling when compared with capping? I've never capped because I don't have any plastic sheeting, I assume the only downside is weight and possibly cost?

Filling is best avoided since it results in a heavy puzzle and often a poor finish. It can be quite tricky to get a good flat surface. You should always aim to cap if possible and only fill if it's not convenient or unsuitable (tiny areas etc).

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 Post subject: Re: Making straight cuts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 2:31 pm 
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For what it's worth I never learned how to cap very well. Filling does make for a heavy puzzle, but I've had good luck with it... Also for me I found it easier... But Tony is the master so his advice outweighs mine :)

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