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 Post subject: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:00 am 
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Hi Twisty Puzzle Fans,

Our June puzzle, Geranium, is finally online now.

Attachment:
geranium_5.jpg
geranium_5.jpg [ 158.47 KiB | Viewed 6872 times ]


Geranium is a deep-cut planar twisty puzzle with bizarre cuts. It presents a unique challenge which is very different from symmetrical twisty puzzles.

Attachment:
File comment: scrambled
geranium_6.jpg
geranium_6.jpg [ 175.49 KiB | Viewed 6872 times ]


[EDIT]
See it in action here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqcRaXWt5dw
[EDIT]

You can order it right now at verypuzzle.com: http://www.verypuzzle.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=35&product_id=101

Since it is a circular puzzle, I would recommend you to this link and the book mentioned therein: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circleman.htm

=========UPDATE-THANKSGIVING-2013=========

Pocket Geranium
Attachment:
dsc_pge_1.jpg
dsc_pge_1.jpg [ 286.36 KiB | Viewed 2502 times ]



Mini Geranium
Attachment:
MGe_title.jpg
MGe_title.jpg [ 206.27 KiB | Viewed 2502 times ]

Attachment:
MGe_pack_2.jpg
MGe_pack_2.jpg [ 174.96 KiB | Viewed 2502 times ]


=========UPDATE-THANKSGIVING-2013=========

Enjoy!

Leslie


Last edited by Leslie Le on Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:08 am 
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Very Beautiful Artwork! Seems like very hard~Got to order one~


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:33 am 
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Looks nice, would it be right to say it jumbles ? Would at least need a lot of cuts to unbandage it.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 2:12 pm 
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You should have called your company Very BEAUTIFUL Puzzle :lol:

Will you be putting up a video? I'd like to see how smoothly the puzzle turns before buying (although I will most likely buy it anyway!!)


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 2:19 pm 
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A piece of art! It really looks difficult to scramble and solve.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 2:59 pm 
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5hinigami wrote:
Looks nice, would it be right to say it jumbles ? Would at least need a lot of cuts to unbandage it.

None of the 5 circles are rotationally symmetrical, only mirror symmetrical. Every turn partially bandages the puzzle and I think, although I don't know for sure, that every move is a jumbling move.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 5:04 pm 
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Wow, very nice! :)


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:12 am 
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After the first look I though: "Wow! A fivefold Rotascope!"
Then I asked the same question as 5hinigami ...


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 1:22 am 
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Thank you guys for attention and support!

Andreas Nortmann wrote:
Then I asked the same question as 5hinigami ...


I'm not sure what jumbling exactly refers to in this case but you can take a look at the video(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqcRaXWt5dw) I've just uploaded.

ALL cuts have exactly the same radius and whenever a cutting circle is completed, it rotates.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:07 am 
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Leslie Le wrote:
Thank you guys for attention and support!

Andreas Nortmann wrote:
Then I asked the same question as 5hinigami ...


I'm not sure what jumbling exactly refers to in this case but you can take a look at the video(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqcRaXWt5dw) I've just uploaded.

ALL cuts have exactly the same radius and whenever a cutting circle is completed, it rotates.


They meant 'can the puzzle be unbandaged so that no moves are ever blocked'?

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:34 am 
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I really do like the look of this puzzle! I've been meaning to order a copy of the Phantom Fish puzzle as well, so I might just combine the two.

Could I ask how smooth the turning is on it? And is it at all possible for the smaller pieces to be shaken loose if this puzzle is turned upside down?

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:59 am 
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Wow :shock:

I like this.
I like this alot.

I've actually been looking into jumbling flat puzzles recently and I have found several very exciting geometries that work perfectly well, but I completely missed this one. I was focusing on only patterns that could be repeated via translations (which I believe are equivalent to vertex-transitive tessellations) . But this.... This is something different.

Is it jumbling? Hmmm, it certainly appears to be. Pieces interact at TWO different levels on this puzzle, even though the order of the puzzle is clearly one layer per grip. Adjacent faces interact when any face is rotated 108 degrees clockwise or counterclockwise. That's 108 degrees exactly, by the way. The "deeper" interaction is between faces that are not adjacent. This is extremely similar to the shallowest type of jumbling on fact turning icosahedra, except this puzzle is flat. Interactions occur at 36 degrees, 108 degrees, and 144 degrees again both clockwise and counter clockwise from the starting position. Again all exact integers. Now this is a bit odd because that means the potential stopping angles for every face occur at 0, 36, 108, 144, 216, 252, and 324 degrees clockwise from the starting position. Funnily enough these are all mutiples of 36 degrees, so if this can be unbandaged, it would HAVE to make each face based on a decagon. But.... a decagon cannot tile the plane!!!! No, no, this doesn't add up at all. In order to fully unbandage this, we would have to create a vertex transitive tessellation using only decagons, and such a thing is impossible.

So I will have to declare that this is indeed a flat jumbling puzzle, but there is something more subtle going on here. This is somewhere between a Helicopter Cube, which would correspond to a periodic tiling, and Oskar's Fairly Twisted, which would correspond to an incomplete tiling that does not fill the plane at all.

It's clear that this puzzle is based on a tessallation that fills the plane, but not a vertex transitive one. In fact, it would have to be non-periodic, but that would make it..... OHHHHH!!!!!!! I get it now! I know why this works :) Oh this is CLEVER. A flat puzzle based off a non-periodic PENROSE TILING. Bravo, bravo! I suggest anyone who would like to get a better grasp of this geometry study that picture for a bit.

Yes this is absolutely a jumbling puzzle. Every move is a jumble move, but the REASON why here is a bit shocking. It is the same phenomenon that occurs on a Helicopter Cube or the Meteor Madness (not the Mixup Cubes... I still don't agree with that one :oops: ), but it comes about from a very unique property of the geometry here. A property that I don't think a single other puzzle has ever used...

I don't know how you came up with this, but it opens up all sorts of possibilities. Does a 3-d equivalent exist? I'm not even sure how the analogy would work there. I need to think about it some more.

FANTASTIC puzzle and what an original idea! Congratulations :mrgreen:

Peace,
Matt Galla


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:44 am 
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Allagem wrote:
I get it now! I know why this works :) Oh this is CLEVER. A flat puzzle based off a non-periodic PENROSE TILING. Bravo, bravo! I suggest anyone who would like to get a better grasp of this geometry study that picture for a bit
A great analysis Matt. You can also see the Pensrose circles on page 49 of the Circle Puzzler's Manual given in the first post by Leslie.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:47 am 
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Page 49?! Way too far in :lol:

Just kidding. Great find. :D

Now I want to see a flat puzzle based off of this geometry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pinwheel_3.jpg

Peace,
Matt Galla


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 7:11 am 
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Allagem wrote:
It's clear that this puzzle is based on a tessallation that fills the plane,


I'm not sure that is clear, or necessarily true. You can turn any arrangement of overlapping circles into a puzzle if you don't mind the pieces being jumbled/bandaged. Of course, it works best when the circles have more in common, i.e. common radius, common distance to nearest neighbour, common angles between nearest neighbours. It is only if you want a fully unbandaged puzzle that you need there to be symmetry (assuming that the circles overlap enough that the cuts intersect).

If you were to try to unbandage this puzzle, you would have to do infinitely many cuts until some parts are nothing but dust. I think this is one of the definitions of a jumbling puzzle, and as far as I know, the first puzzle to feature this property is the Battle Gear by Douglas Engel.

Gus wrote:
Allagem wrote:
I get it now! I know why this works :) Oh this is CLEVER. A flat puzzle based off a non-periodic PENROSE TILING. Bravo, bravo! I suggest anyone who would like to get a better grasp of this geometry study that picture for a bit
A great analysis Matt. You can also see the Pensrose circles on page 49 of the Circle Puzzler's Manual given in the first post by Leslie.


Here is a direct link to the Penrose circle puzzle.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:41 am 
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jaap wrote:
Allagem wrote:
It's clear that this puzzle is based on a tessallation that fills the plane,


I'm not sure that is clear, or necessarily true


Sure it's true!

I drew the picture that evolved in my head to illustrate some of the geometric properties of this puzzle.
Attachment:
GeraniumGeometry.png
GeraniumGeometry.png [ 196.93 KiB | Viewed 6246 times ]

You can see the underlying Penrose Tiling that the puzzle is based on in straight maroon lines. I obviously can't draw the infinitely large tiling, but hopefully this is enough to see the pattern - the irregular hexagons sort of form chains that make the sides of increasingly larger pentagons in alternating orientations. There are 4 pentagon layers shown here: the first and second layer have one tile per side, the third and fourth layer have two tiles per side. The pink and teal circles represent the two depths of interaction among the faces that I described in my first post. The only grips that have been implemented by the Germanium puzzle are those represented by the black dots, but you can see evidence of the nearby red dots in the solved puzzle - they cause the complete arcs that leave the edges of the puzzle 8-)

Note that none of the circles show the cuts directly, you would have to pick only one color of circle and expand them all about their centers just a bit to create the exact cut pattern.

Hope it's inspiring :)

Peace,
Matt Galla


Last edited by Allagem on Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:00 am 
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This puzzle is pretty awesome, and pretty.

jaap wrote:
If you were to try to unbandage this puzzle, you would have to do infinitely many cuts until some parts are nothing but dust. I think this is one of the definitions of a jumbling puzzle, and as far as I know, the first puzzle to feature this property is the Battle Gear by Douglas Engel.
I disagree. Is this not a full unbandaging of the Battle Gear? The cuts aren't deep enough for jumbling to arise.

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Can all rotary puzzles with rotationally symmetric arrangements of grips that don't use three-, four-, sixfold or irrational-angled symmetry be represented as a Penrose tiling?

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:53 am 
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Allagem wrote:
Now this is a bit odd because that means the potential stopping angles for every face occur at 0, 36, 108, 144, 216, 252, and 324 degrees clockwise from the starting position. Funnily enough these are all mutiples of 36 degrees
Hmmm... I'm still missing something. I suspect that if I tried this I'd answer my own question but let me throw this out there before I find the time to try this. This puzzle has 5 circles/grips. Each grip has 10 valid stopping positions so doesn't the puzzle (if unbandaged) in principle have 10^5 states? Each state requires 5 circular cuts to exsure each grip is unbandaged. So why can't this puzzle be unbandaged with 5*10^5 cuts? If it can it doesn't jumble as that is a finite number...
Allagem wrote:
The only grips that have been implemented by the Germanium puzzle are those represented by the black dots, but you can see evidence of the nearby red dots in the solved puzzle - they cause the complete arcs that leave the edges of the puzzle
There are several reasons I can see why this approach might fail:

(1) Even with all these cuts the puzzle may still not be doctrinare. As Matt points out there are cuts from 5 other non-implemented grips seen in the solved state. I can see that may require us to consider all possible states of those grips (even though they aren't implemented) to ensure a doctrinaire puzzle. So it may require up to 5*10^10 cuts. Still finite so therefore it still doesn't jumble.

(2) The addition of all these cuts opens up many more valid stopping positions... which require more cuts... which creates more stopping positions... etc. On to infinity and then yes this puzzle jumbles. Actually this would be my guess as for the most likely event in this case. I just can't see it without trying it.

(3) Something else is going on here that I don't yet understand which also wouldn't surprise me.

GREAT PUZZLE. I'm curious if this puzzle can reach a state where all is solved except the center pieces is in the wrong orientation. If yes, I wonder how much harder the super version (where each pieces had a unique position and orientation in the solved state) would be? The only way I see to do that is to put a picture on the puzzle.

Carl

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 11:38 am 
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wwwmwww wrote:
[...] This puzzle has 5 circles/grips. Each grip has 10 valid stopping positions so doesn't the puzzle (if unbandaged) in principle have 10^5 states? Each state requires 5 circular cuts to exsure each grip is unbandaged. So why can't this puzzle be unbandaged with 5*10^5 cuts? If it can it doesn't jumble as that is a finite number...

I don't think this sort of analysis holds because it doesn't take into account the path a piece has taken and the orientation of a piece as it is moved by turns.

For example, we know the 45 degree Rubik's cube jumbles. You can't just say that each face has 8 positions so (8*6)^6 cuts have to be applied. As you move pieces around the puzzle and they change orientation, you can still find a piece that needs an additional cut in it, even after you've applied (8*6)^6 cuts. The same should hold for this Geranium circle puzzle.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:50 pm 
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bmenrigh wrote:
I don't think this sort of analysis holds because it doesn't take into account the path a piece has taken and the orientation of a piece as it is moved by turns.
It should still be valid IF the resulting puzzle is doctrinaire. If its not doctrinare then I was thinking we'd be in space where my option (1) would cover it. However I now think that is incorrect. I suspect it could still be non-doctrinaire even after the other grips are covered.

Hmmm... let's for a moment assume the puzzle is NON-doctrinaire after all these cuts are applied. If we are still limited to just 5 grips which each just having 10 valid stopping positions. Doesn't that still just limit us to a finite number of valid positions and orientations for each piece? If so can't we just place each piece in all valid positions and orientations and apply these 5 circular cuts to each at a piece level. I think that would guarentee that the puzzle would never become bandaged. Granted at this point we are talking about a HUGE number of pieces and an even bigger number of cuts... but they should still be finte. The only way I see for this to break is if the extra cuts open up additional stopping positions and if that repeats yes you can eaily get an infinite number of valid orientations for a given piece.

I think I just need to try this and see what happens... just not sure when I'll get the time to play with it.

Carl

P.S. Just realized this could still be an iterative process even with a finite numer of orientations. In which case I would think the final cut pattern could make for a rather interesting fractal.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:37 pm 
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it isn't clear from the video, but if one turned the puzzle upside down, do the pieces fall out? (especially the little triangular pieces?)


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:24 pm 
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Leslie Le wrote:
Geranium is a deep-cut planar twisty puzzle with bizarre cuts.
One other question... is the term deep cut applicable to planar twisty puzzles? It is certainly "deeper" that is typical as the center of the nearest neighbors is included in each circle's turn. But all the axes of rotation are parallel. If we think of this as a 3D puzzle one could visualize these as planar cuts which are very shallow on the surface of a near infinite sphere. In which case these would be considered very very shallow cuts.

Carl

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:28 pm 
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wwwmwww wrote:
One other question... is the term deep cut applicable to planar twisty puzzles? It is certainly "deeper" that is typical as the center of the nearest neighbors is included in each circle's turn.
On page 39 of the aforementioned book it says

"A circle puzzle where the circumference of each rotary circle extends past the centre of the rotary circle it intersects is a deepcut circle puzzle."

We should probably call it "Beyond Center-Cut" or something else since we still can't really agree on what "deep cut" means in the generic case.

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:32 pm 
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@rubikcollector123
Actually I was designing this puzzle without jumbling/unbandanging in head.

@Paradox, @Derek Bosch
Thank you for your interest in our products. When lined up, moving is effortless. All pieces are secured and none of them will fall out in any state.

@Allagem
The design starts from a configuration of circles like that of Rex Dodecahedron, or simply an imitation of Geranium flower, inspired by a random pattern I can't even remember clearly.

The early prototype back in 2011 was a failure:
Attachment:
File comment: gflower
DSCF1929-s.JPG
DSCF1929-s.JPG [ 110.29 KiB | Viewed 5947 times ]


Someday I found it interesting to go one step further: increase mobility. I wasn't officially unbandaging the circles at all. After some programming verifications, the project was officially initiated in early 2012. Here's one of the prototypes.
Attachment:
pt.jpg
pt.jpg [ 118.46 KiB | Viewed 5947 times ]

@Carl, I suppose this is the super 'stickered' one.

The ground geometry illustrated by Matt is right (and cool), it is not designed as a translative puzzle. The complete theoretical analysis is challenging, I'll leave this part to you (I'm preparing your orders, Sir). Just to mention that if all circles, including incomplete ones, are completed, the drawing will be messy, unbandaging will result in a plate of physical dust. I think I have the same problem as listed in jaap's 'Circle Puzzler's Manual' page(http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circleman.htm#p52)

"Is there an algorithm for solving a complicated random circle puzzle?" (Point 4, Page 52)

@bmenrigh, @Carl
"A circle puzzle where the circumference of each rotary circle extends past the centre of the rotary circle it intersects is a deepcut circle puzzle."

This is why I use the term 'deepcut'. Circles in this configuration have a stable region such that changing radius will not change the topology of regions.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:30 am 
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Leslie Le wrote:
"A circle puzzle where the circumference of each rotary circle extends past the centre of the rotary circle it intersects is a deepcut circle puzzle."

This is why I use the term 'deepcut'.
Fair enough. Thanks for stating your definition. I just don't like that definition and feel we have too many contradictory definitions of deep cut floating around.

To me many 3D puzzles can be viewed as circle puzzle... they are just on the surface of a finite sphere instead of an infinite plane. Using this definition a 2x2x2 for example would not be considered deep cut and a Starminx would be. These both disagree with the meaning deep cut typically has with regards to 3D twisty puzzles.

Carl

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:45 pm 
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wwwmwww wrote:
Leslie Le wrote:
"A circle puzzle where the circumference of each rotary circle extends past the centre of the rotary circle it intersects is a deepcut circle puzzle."

This is why I use the term 'deepcut'.
Fair enough. Thanks for stating your definition. I just don't like that definition and feel we have too many contradictory definitions of deep cut floating around.

To me many 3D puzzles can be viewed as circle puzzle... they are just on the surface of a finite sphere instead of an infinite plane. Using this definition a 2x2x2 for example would not be considered deep cut and a Starminx would be. These both disagree with the meaning deep cut typically has with regards to 3D twisty puzzles.

Carl


Carl I appreciate your attempt to define a unambiguous definition. Whether a puzzle is deepcut or not, is sometimes dependent on its physical representation. So my idea would be, first define puzzles, especially sequential movement puzzles in terms of group theory, with all physical elements included(yes physical representation enters the equation such that we can tell the difference between V4 and mf8 444), then take a look at what's really deep enough to be classified as a special subset. For your consideration.

Take plane as an open sphere, then... yes they just seem alike. Geranium can also be wrapped on a sphere with a few singularities.

On the business end, I tend to use easily understandable concepts / names rather than perfectly defined technical terms, I think you can understand this choice.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:37 pm 
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Leslie Le wrote:
I think you can understand this choice.
Oh... yes. And I'm certainly not trying to argue. You took a term that was well defined in the Circle Puzzler's Manual and certainly used it correctly. Rather I like it or not shouldn't be of issue. I do the same all the time myself. My definition of "order" for example differs from most here. I just try to make clear what definition I'm using when I use the term.

And I just noticed that book is copyright 1986, as such that definition of "deep cut" probably predates any discussion of that term among members here. So its probably me that should be using another term for what I think of as "deep cut" as that term was taken and already defined.

Regardless of what classification terms we try to come up with at the end of the day its the puzzle that matters and this is a great puzzle.

And the more I think about it that book in my opinion was way ahead of its time. The name Douglas A. Engel didn't ring any bells. I did a quick search and found this page:

http://www.puzzleatomic.com/

I wonder if he's a member here.

Carl

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:45 am 
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I can't quite tell from the pictures, can the fasteners on this puzzle be unscrewed, or are they fixed?

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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:04 am 
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wwwmwww wrote:
The name Douglas A. Engel didn't ring any bells. I did a quick search and found this page:

http://www.puzzleatomic.com/ I wonder if he's a member here.

Carl


Doug is an amazing man who has invented many different types of brilliant puzzles.
Sadly, he is not as well known as he should be, but his work has been seen in many places.

I am sure he knows about the forum, but not sure the frequency he browses it.
But he is a member of the IPP, where he does bring many of his inventions.

He was also at the New York Toy Fair, and his little booth (General Symmetrics) was one
of my favourite places when I was there! Photo here:

download/file.php?id=35072&mode=view

And Leslie.... what a beautiful puzzle. I showed it to my wife and now I have two reasons to get it!

:)


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:44 am 
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@Carl: Thank you for understanding and I understand your pursuit of up-to-date models and concepts.

@Paradox: They can be unscrewed using hexagonal drivers together with a wrench.

@Pantazis: Thank you for the background information, and your praise of course.


One thing I didn't mention is that, the background of each Geranium, as shown in the picture below, is never repeated.

Attachment:
geranium_4.jpg
geranium_4.jpg [ 142.94 KiB | Viewed 5392 times ]


I'll reveal this little secret until someone makes a first review here. ^^


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:23 pm 
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Coaster1235 wrote:
Is this not a full unbandaging of the Battle Gear? The cuts aren't deep enough for jumbling to arise.

Image


Yes that's a complete unbandaging of the Battle Gear, and I suspect that the Geranium can be completely unbandaged in a finite number of cuts as well, although the number of pieces is likely to be very large.


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 6:28 pm 
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My Geranium puzzle arrived today! Thank you Leslie!
It came well wrapped in a nice box:
Attachment:
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Image0403.jpg [ 235.19 KiB | Viewed 4926 times ]

Size comparison:
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Image0405.jpg [ 276.92 KiB | Viewed 4926 times ]


First impressions: It's every bit as nice looking as the pictures in this thread suggest. Movement is smooth although it can catch if not aligned properly - despite the number of pieces it turns just as well as the Binary Arts Turn Stile. It can be mixed VERY easily, after a few practice turns I got quite a shock when I realised the "solved" position I had it in was not correct - luckily I did figure it out though. While the fasteners may open to allow cheating it is not too easily done (like with the Moeraki ) as it would require some tools.
The only thing I can see to worry about is how the stickers will hold up to repeated handling as the other puzzles I have of this type all use coloured plastic rather than stickers.

Thanks again Leslie, I'm looking forward to giving this a good scramble!
Leslie Le wrote:
One thing I didn't mention is that, the background of each Geranium...is never repeated.
I'll reveal this little secret until someone makes a first review here. ^^

I have no ideas about this I'm afraid...


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 9:52 pm 
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Location: P.R.China
Zzupler wrote:
The only thing I can see to worry about is how the stickers will hold up to repeated handling as the other puzzles I have of this type all use coloured plastic rather than stickers.


Mostly to keep the tradition of twisty puzzles. Vivid plastic pigment usually fades out easily(e.g. organic pigment).

Zzupler wrote:
I have no ideas about this I'm afraid...


First, I wrote a program generating a huge picture (at the size of dozens of square meters) containing random circles in random color and radius. Then print it in pages(hundreds of A4 papers). The process is quite similar to printing maps using split joint method. Finally cut a background from printed papers. ^^

Thank you for the first review!


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:42 am 
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Location: Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Another Geranium from VeryPuzzle - Pocket Geranium

http://www.verypuzzle.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=102
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Geranium from VeryPuzzle
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:02 am 
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These are both absolutely gorgeous puzzles! Both are probably a bit beyond my puzzle solving abilities but I'm incredibly excited to add them both to my collection!


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