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 Post subject: Could having springs under a center piece benefit a puzzle?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:39 am 
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Hello everyone! I have a question about putting a set of springs on a puzzle (in this case a V-cube 5) but instead of the usual place, I would put them underneath the center. My reason for doing this is because I was reassembling my old V-cube 5, and remembered that one of the long centers had broke where it would cover the core. So after some time I decided to make it have an adjustable core, but the piece kept falling down (since the part that covers the core was non-existent).

So in case this was not easy to understand, I drew up a picture, because my camera still doesn't work.
Attachment:
2springs.png
2springs.png [ 4.14 KiB | Viewed 392 times ]


So I attempted this and noticed something interesting. When you have a spring pushing down, and one pushing up, it keeps the center in place but also acts like a reversed tension. I know it's obvious that such can happen, but could this prove to be useful with other puzzles? Could this have a term in the puzzle world? (mirrior-tension is the best description that comes to mind)

So would having a spring underneath the center piece have any benefit, besides holding the piece in place?

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