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 Post subject: Screws made of WSF material
PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 3:36 am 
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Hey everyone! My question is as follows, do you think that screws made from white strong and flexible material would be a good idea or bad?

I learned to make screws in SolidWorks and I have been thinking about it.

Thats all :D and I didn't know where to post this :oops:

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 Post subject: Re: Screws made of WSF material
PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 3:51 am 
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Location: Chichester, England
Not much point. Might as well use normal machine screws. Also, if you did print the screws, then you may need to design the screw holes to allow the thread to pass through them, as opposed to the normal method of just cutting out a circle.

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 Post subject: Re: Screws made of WSF material
PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 1:07 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 3:11 am
Location: Oregon, USA
I happen to I have a lot of practical experience with 3D printed screws and nuts like these...

Attachment:
File comment: 3D printed screws built in SLA (left), FDM (center), and LOM (right).
IMG_6750.JPG
IMG_6750.JPG [ 162.73 KiB | Viewed 725 times ]


In my experience screw threads work best in plotter-type 3D printing processes because they manufacture continuous, smoothly-curved outlines, and the screw axis should be perpendicular to the build plane for optimal results. Examples are SLA (stereolithography), FDM (fused deposition modeling), and LOM (laminated object manufacturing). Shapeways does not offer any of these processes and does not allow you to specify build orientation.

The White Strong & Flexible material is sintered via a galvo laser in a rasterized pattern. In other words, each layer is scanned onto the surface like TV pixels, not traced like a plotter. More troublingly, the material shrinks after production. (The software tries to compensate for anticipated shrinkage, but there's still some distortion.)

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