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 Post subject: Tony Fisher's signed TRUNCATED OCTAHEDRON auction
PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 1:13 pm 
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On Wednesday 7th June a 10 day auction starts for one of my Truncated Octahedral transformations of the Skewb. It's the first one I have ever signed. It is made using my older moulding technique. When I made the moulds the factory made Skewb Diamonds were not available and I have continued making them this way.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 1:50 pm 
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Location: Boston, MA
*drool*


Why cant i have like $500 :cry:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:50 pm 
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Ryan, the last one went for 97 GBP and many of the high bidders already own one so you just never know....
The video is now available-

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... 7738679884


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 4:12 pm 
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o ya tony, i was looking at your golden cube construction thread again, and i was wondering, did you use that Fastglas resin to make this puzzle. If you did, would you recommend it for a first time mold user, or is it hard to work with/does not produce great results? :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:08 pm 
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I wouldn't recommend it at all. It is something I discovered many years ago and got used to using it. It's far better to use plastic card (polystyrene sheet) which I also use now or some of the other moulding materials. If you search through more old posts you'll find lots of discussions and useful information regarding construction techniques.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:15 pm 
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Here's the auction link-
http://search.ebay.co.uk/search/search. ... ony+fisher


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 9:59 pm 
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hey Tony,

how much more difficult would you say this 8 colored puzzle is to the 4 colored one? i have an older version of your puzzle but with only 4 colored centers, opposing centers matched.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 10:40 pm 
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Tony, one quick question. If you use the card often, you most likely have a quick and accurate way of cutting it. What is this way? Im in the middle of a serious mod now that requires molding, and im making the masters out of i bleieve 1/16 inch vinyl sheeting, or at least i think its vinyl. Anyway, its too thick to cut with scissors, so i have to use my dad's tin snips, and they leave unclean edges and are generally inaccurate. I need my pieces to be perfect. What should i use to cut the plastic? :?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 5:53 am 
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Reeech,
I think yours in practise is a lttle harder as it's not always clear which piece goes where. It may appear to have less combinations than my newer one but I am pretty sure it has the same amount. This is partly due to the fact that you can't ever swap 2 opposite corners on a Skewb (or the equivalent triangular centers on my Truncated Octahedron) since they are physically different in terms of mechanism.
Ryan,
You should use a craft knife and metal rule to cut the plastic. A scalpel is not really sturdy enough and a stanley knife is a bit to bulky. If I was making something where lots of rectangles for example were needed, I first mark the measurements along all 4 sides of a sheet. Then, rather than cut right through I usually scratch lightly where I will cut, then without moving the rule make more cuts and finally snap the plastic. Mind your fingers!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 10:19 pm 
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TOny, what do you use to get your edges nice and smooth on your pieces. I use a dremel sanding drum with a fine grit and then the polishing wheel, but that can be innacurate at times. What do you use? :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 5:55 am 
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I scrape the edge across a piece of wet and dry (240 or 120 depending on size of piece) sitting on a perfectly flat suface. I then use my fingers and small squares (3x3 inches) of 240 and 600. It will make your fingers sore if you do it for long periods. It's really about finding what works for you. I am sure everybody does it differently and I am sure there are better ways than mine.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 6:38 am 
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i know tony, im not trying to copy your methods, because, quite frankly, that sounds like it takes a long time, i was only wondering because your edges look fantastic, and i was wondering if you had figured out some special trick to do them with. But don't worry, im not going to copy you. :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:48 pm 
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I don't mind at all if you want to copy my methods. I just want you to realise that there is nothing special about the way I do things. My one piece of advise would be to spend time on the finish and insure you make nice stickers. A lot of people make fantastic mods but forget to finish them properly. I have certainly been guilty of this on occasions.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 4:48 pm 
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Location: NC, USA
Good point Tony. On all of your puzzles I see, I always notice the wonderful asthetic quality of the puzzle, along with the function. What do you use to finish your black-plastic puzzles? Do you do some prep to the pieces first to give them a certain look?

Apok


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:18 am 
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Some of my puzzles are finished with a gloss spray paint. It comes from hobby shops and is suitable for plastics. Normally however I use a good quality wedge tip marker pen. I then polish it with a rag to give it a shine and so that it doesn't come off on your hands. Neither method is perfect. If black polystyrene plastic sheet is being used then increasingly finer grades of wet and dry paper plus buffing on a wheel gives pretty good results. It is more time consuming though and doesn't disguise any filled in holes.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:03 pm 
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Tony Fisher wrote:
A lot of people make fantastic mods but forget to finish them properly.

You are absolutely right Tony!
I am particularly guilty of that. Sometimes I don't have enough time, sometimes patience. But in both cases I always regret it later. Especially once you've posted closeup pictures on twisty it shows straight away. I guess that's what separates me from such great puzzle makers like Tony, Okamoto-san, Anthony Greenhill, Hidetoshi and others. I feel so cross with myself for not finishing any of my puzzles prperly! :evil:
Maybe one day...
Vadim


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:36 pm 
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Location: Orange County, CA, USA
I am guilty of leaving my ABS plastic pieces "raw" for the most part. I usually hit it with some fine grit paper (600 or higher) and then polish it using a variety of methods. It's somewhat Time consuming and the resulting puzzle never truly has a "shine" to it, but it's not too bad.

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