Online since 2002. Over 3300 puzzles, 2600 worldwide members, and 270,000 messages.

TwistyPuzzles.com Forum

It is currently Wed Apr 23, 2014 1:22 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Antikythera Mechanism
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 12:19 pm
Antikythera Mechanism

Any one read about this?



By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS, Associated Press Writer Fri Dec 1, 1:13 AM ET

ATHENS, Greece - Imagine tossing a top-notch laptop into the sea, leaving scientists from a foreign culture to scratch their heads over its corroded remains centuries later. A Roman shipmaster inadvertently did something just like it 2,000 years ago off southern Greece, experts said late Thursday.

They claim to have identified a handful of puzzling metal scraps found in the wreck as the earliest known mechanical computing device that pinpointed astronomical events.

Known as the Antikythera Mechanism — from the island off which the Roman ship sank — the assemblage of cogs and wheels looks like the innards of a very badly maintained grandfather clock.

Only the first clockwork devices appeared more than a thousand years later in western Europe.

"It was a pocket calculator of the time," said astronomer John Seiradakis.

Seiradakis, a professor of astronomy at the University of Thessaloniki, was among an international team including British, Greek and U.S. scientists who used specially developed x-ray scanning and imaging technology to analyze the corroded bronze, revealing hidden machinery and a form of written user's manual.

"We have used the latest technology available to understand this mechanism, yet the technological quality in this mechanism puts us to shame," said project leader Mike Edmunds, professor of astronomy at Cardiff University. "If the ancient Greeks made this, what else could they do?"

Ever since its discovery a century ago, the complex mechanism has baffled scientists.

Edmunds said the 82 surviving fragments, dated to between 140-100 B.C, contain over 30 gear wheels, and "are covered with astronomical, mathematical and mechanical inscriptions."

"It was a calendar of the moon and sun, it predicted the possibility of eclipses, it showed the position of the sun and moon in the zodiac, the phase of the moon, and we believe also it may have shown the position of some of the planets, possibly just Venus and Mercury," he said.

The box-shaped mechanism — the size of office paper and operated with a hand-crank — could predict an eclipse to a precise hour on a specific day.

"The design of the mechanism is very wonderful, making us realize how highly technological the ancient Greek civilization was. Much more so perhaps than we thought," Edmunds said.

The new study of the ancient device, with the aid of Hewlett Packard and the British x-ray equipment maker X-Tek, more than doubled the amount of the inscriptions readable on the mechanism.

"We will not yet be able to answer the question of what the mechanism was for, although now we know what the mechanism did," Edmunds said.

The first comparable devices known in the west were clockwork clocks developed during the Middle Ages.

The Antikythera device was probably made on the island of Rhodes, which had a long tradition in astronomy and applied mechanics.

The sunken ship, thought to have been carrying plunder from Roman-conquered Greece to Rome, is believed to have sailed from Rhodes.

It sank in the first century B.C.

The wreck was found in 1900 by Greek sponge-divers 50 meters (164 feet) deep and just off the small island of Antikythera, on what is still a busy trade route between southern mainland Greece and Crete.

A systematic search of the wreck revealed a group of bronze and badly weathered marble statues, as well as the Antikythera Mechanism, in what remained of its original wooden casing.

All the finds — including wine jars, pottery, silver coins and plates — are now at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.


Attachments:
Antikythera Mechanism.jpg
Antikythera Mechanism.jpg [ 63.96 KiB | Viewed 1282 times ]

_________________
http://www.rockstargames.com/V/
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 10:20 am
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
I have heard of something like this, possibly this one (I think the name sounds familiar) but that was some year ago, so at that point they can't have discovered as much as now and probably they weren't as amazed by it either...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 6:55 pm
Seems like I saw something about this on tv maybe 2 years ago. Did they find another one?

Pretty neat.

EDIT: Same time post, same kind of post


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 10:20 am
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Athefre wrote:
Seems like I saw something about this on tv maybe 2 years ago. Did they find another one?


It could be the same one, but if not, I guess it would have come from some other ship, because I guess the article would have mentioned if there ha been more than one, and this isn't one of those news that are so new that they havn't had time to find correct information (at least considering wether there were one or more mechanisms)...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 6:55 pm
Haara wrote:
Athefre wrote:
Seems like I saw something about this on tv maybe 2 years ago. Did they find another one?


It could be the same one, but if not, I guess it would have come from some other ship, because I guess the article would have mentioned if there ha been more than one, and this isn't one of those news that are so new that they havn't had time to find correct information (at least considering wether there were one or more mechanisms)...


That makes sense. It looks like the one I saw before.

It probably is the same one, look at this:

http://www.giant.net.au/users/rupert/ky ... thera3.htm

Says it was found in 1901. Look at the second picture, looks exactly like it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 12:19 pm
hmmm, sorry if this was old... (excuse the pun) but i just read this yesterday... maybe they found something newer?

_________________
http://www.rockstargames.com/V/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Antikythera
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 7:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2003 11:17 am
reeeech wrote:
hmmm, sorry if this was old... (excuse the pun) but i just read this yesterday... maybe they found something newer?


It's the same one. What's new is the x-ray tomography which is allowing them to see through the mechanism and read the inscriptions on the inside surfaces.

It is said that there was something of the same sort in the library of Alexandria.

David J


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 10:20 am
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
reeeech wrote:
hmmm, sorry if this was old... (excuse the pun) but i just read this yesterday... maybe they found something newer?


You don't have to be sorry, absolutely didn't mean to say this wasn't news!

As David says, the news is that the have deciphered (?) it with new technology...

And for me, I just had the notion that I had seen (in newspaper) something similar somewhere, and that might have been when they anounced the project (just guessing)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 10:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 10:50 pm
Location: New York
I think that was one the show called "discoveries this week". it's a science show where they talk about new inventions. some one had copied the greek one and made one that works. it was really neat looking and was very complex. it even acomidated for the illution of backwards movement in the planets.

_________________
Average: 14.38 seconds

Individual Times: 14.17, 12.93, (12.89), 13.12, 14.00, 15.59, 16.23, 14.11, 14.03, (17.61), 14.75, 14.89


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2006 3:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 6:55 pm
It really is amazing.

There probably isn't many people that could make one of those NOW without looking at the one already made.

Someone now would probably be using calculators and computers to help.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Forum powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group